“The MWRD is working with i2m to develop additional technology that employs a ceramic membrane, CERA~DUR, to improve biomass harvesting through a process that reduces energy consumption. The algae could remove at least 50 percent of phosphorus from used water and can be harvested and commoditized for production of bioplastics, biochemicals, biofuels, pharmaceuticals and dyes; or used as fertilizer or as aquaculture feed.

The MWRD Working with i2m to Dewater Algae

The MWRD Working with i2m to Dewater Algae

On October 4th, i2m performed a live algae pilot study featuring our ceramic hollow fiber membrane technology, CERA~DUR, during a plant tour organized by WEFTEC at one of the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District (MWRD) of Greater Chicago’s facilities. CERA~DUR was following a Revolving Algal Biofilm (RAB) system. Our objective was to dewater the algae tank used by the RAB system and deliver high quality water to be disposed.

See what the MWRD has to say about our algae pilot study with them:

“Water professionals and industry experts from across the globe descended on the MWRD’s O’Brien Water Reclamation Plant to view the MWRD’s latest creation in resource recovery: Algae! It turns out algae naturally uptakes phosphorus and nitrogen from water to support its growth through photosynthesis, utilizing the sun as its energy source. This same approach can be applied to water treatment as a means to remove phosphorus from the used water stream without the use of inorganic chemicals or additional energy, which is the current means of nutrient removal. The MWRD has partnered with Iowa State University and Gross-Wen Technologies to implement the Revolving Biofilm Reactor at the O’Brien WRP. The MWRD is researching the sustainability of growing algae in this “vertical revolving” fashion; reducing the footprint to grow an equivalent algae biomass in a surface pond and simplifying the harvesting process. The MWRD is also working with i2m to develop additional technology that employs a ceramic membrane, CERA~DUR, to improve biomass harvesting through a process that reduces energy consumption. The algae could remove at least 50 percent of phosphorus from used water and can be harvested and commoditized for production of bioplastics, biochemicals, biofuels, pharmaceuticals and dyes; or used as fertilizer or as aquaculture feed. As an example of these products, tour goers were treated to a complimentary flowerpot made from the algae recovered. The tour was given as part of the annual Water Environment Federation’s Technical Exhibition and Conference (WEFTEC), the world’s largest annual water quality conference and exhibition hosted at McCormick Place.” The Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago 

On October 4th, i2m performed a live algae pilot study featuring our ceramic hollow fiber membrane technology, CERA~DUR, during a plant tour organized by WEFTEC at one of the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District (MWRD) of Greater Chicago’s facilities. CERA~DUR was following a Revolving Algal Biofilm (RAB) system. Our objective was to dewater the algae tank used by the RAB system and deliver high quality water to be disposed.

See what the MWRD has to say about our algae pilot study with them:

“Water professionals and industry experts from across the globe descended on the MWRD’s O’Brien Water Reclamation Plant to view the MWRD’s latest creation in resource recovery: Algae! It turns out algae naturally uptakes phosphorus and nitrogen from water to support its growth through photosynthesis, utilizing the sun as its energy source. This same approach can be applied to water treatment as a means to remove phosphorus from the used water stream without the use of inorganic chemicals or additional energy, which is the current means of nutrient removal. The MWRD has partnered with Iowa State University and Gross-Wen Technologies to implement the Revolving Biofilm Reactor at the O’Brien WRP. The MWRD is researching the sustainability of growing algae in this “vertical revolving” fashion; reducing the footprint to grow an equivalent algae biomass in a surface pond and simplifying the harvesting process. The MWRD is also working with i2m to develop additional technology that employs a ceramic membrane, CERA~DUR, to improve biomass harvesting through a process that reduces energy consumption. The algae could remove at least 50 percent of phosphorus from used water and can be harvested and commoditized for production of bioplastics, biochemicals, biofuels, pharmaceuticals and dyes; or used as fertilizer or as aquaculture feed. As an example of these products, tour goers were treated to a complimentary flowerpot made from the algae recovered. The tour was given as part of the annual Water Environment Federation’s Technical Exhibition and Conference (WEFTEC), the world’s largest annual water quality conference and exhibition hosted at McCormick Place.” The Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago